Email:sales@cnrichi.cn 0086-150-03890639
English

FAQ

RiChi & News Industry News FAQ

What Are The Common Hop Varieties Of The Hop Pellet Machine?

  • Clicks:

Hops pellet machine is a pellet machine equipment using hops as raw material. The hops pellets are made from leaf hops that have been hammer crushed into a powder. The powder is then pelletized by passing it through a natural pellet die. The powder contains all the lupulin material of unprocessed leaf hops and vegetative materials which can be used in place of leaf hops in the brewing process. Normally, the equal amount of hops pellets can take up about 10-15 % of additional bitterness as compared to the whole leaf.But hops are divided into dozens of varieties. What are the common varieties of hops used in pellet machines?

ALPHAROMA

A uniquely bred New Zealand hop, this varietal was commercially released in 1983. The unique oil balance and medium alpha acid content of about 5.8% to 10.9% make AlphAroma a dual purpose hop. Put these characteristics to good use by adding this hop to Pale Ales and Lagers to add a firm bitterness as well as a citrusy, fruity aroma. AlphAroma hops are not always the easiest to find, so brewing with them in addition to other multi-purpose hops is typically the way to go.

Alpharoma
Alpharoma

BITTER GOLD

This incredibly acidic varietal comes from the American lineage of hops like Brewer’s Gold, Comet, and Fuggle. With no notable aromatic qualities and a high alpha acid range of 16% to 19%, Bitter Gold is utilized only for bittering. Add it to any brew from your favorite IPA to English Ales and of course English Bitter. While Galena or Nugget hops can be substituted for Bitter Gold, they do not yield the same intensely bittering quality ounce per ounce

BREWERS GOLD

As the result of an open pollination with Wild Manitoba hops back in 1919, Brewers Gold hops are said to be dual purpose, but really work best as a bittering hop. A mild aroma of blackberry, currant, and a little spice can add a unique touch to darker brews like Imperial Stouts. An alpha acid range of about 6% to 10% makes the Brewers Gold hop a versatile bittering hop for your favorite brew. Though this hop grows quickly, it is easily susceptible to harsh conditions that affect the alpha acidic content, so this range can vary from season to season. If you do need to substitute Brewer’s Gold, try varietals like Galena, Bramling Cross, or Cascade.

CASCADE

Cascade Hops have become one of the most popular varieties, the real citrusy workhorse of the craft beer industry. This dual purpose hop is commonly used for both its aromatic and bittering qualities. Flavours of pine, citrus, spice, and floral undertones gives these hops their life and personality. Typically used for American Ales, IPAs, Lagers.

CENTENNIAL

Centennial Hops are a great duel-purpose hop and can be used successfully for both bittering and aroma. Often referred to as the “Super Cascade” these versatile hops are characterized by aromatic pine, citrus, and floral notes. Typically used in IPAs and APAs.

CHINOOK

This popular hop among craft brewers was developed in Washington State by the USDA in 1985. A cross between Petham Golding hops and a high alpha male, this dual purpose hop delivers both bittering power and a rich aroma. Intensely spicy and piney flavors influence the aroma added to any brew with a hint of bright grapefruit. This full flavor provides the perfect balance to a high alpha acid content between 12% and 14%. Earthy aroma and heavy bittering characteristics make Chinook hops perfect for styles like IPAs, APAs, and seasonal brews like Winter Ales and Stouts. As Chinook grows in popularity, it is easy to find in both whole and pellet form for your brew, though for a less intense bitterness you can certainly substitute with Northern Brewer, Columbus, or Nugget hops. Give it a try first by picking up a commercial brew like Karl Strauss Brewing Co.’s Tower 10 IPA.

COLUMBIA

Columbia is a descendent of Fuggle hops and sister hop to Willamette. First released in Oregon in 1967, production continued through the 1980s, but was soon abandoned in favor of more aromatic varietals. Due to the boom in craft brewing, this punchy, citrus hop has been revived since 2011 and is now gaining momentum. Columbia’s signature citrus kick is perfectly suited to light ales like English Style Ales, Pale Ales, and IPAs. An alpha acid range from about 8% to 10% lends a mild bittering quality. You may still need to substitute Columbia hops with a similar varietal like Willamette or Fuggle. Give this hop a taste in commercial brews like Windmer Brothers’ Columbia Common Spring Ale.

COLUMBUS

Also referred to as Tomahawk, Zeus, or the combined acronym of CTZ. Columbus hops are a member of the super popular Three C’s, including Cascade and Centennial. Columbus are among the most widely used in today’s brewing world. Being particularly high in alpha acid levels makes them an ideal bittering hops. MoreBeer! has Columbus available in whole or pellet form. The alpha acid range from about 14% up to 18% adds a smooth bitterness that works best in IPAs as well as Pale Ales and Imperial styles. To get the most aroma out of this dual purpose varietal, try the dry hopping process and relish in the pungent, peppery and licorice scent it will add to your brew. Since Tomahawk and Zeus are essentially the same as Columbus, they can certainly be substituted in your brew along with Chinook or Nugget. See how you like it in commercial brews like Bison Brewing Co.’s Organic IPA or Mercury Brewing’s Ipswitch Harvest Ale.

columbus hops
columbus hops

COMET

A cross between English Sunshine and a native American wild hop, the Comet hop was bred by the USDA in 1974 to meet the need for a higher alpha producing hop. Though commercial production has slowed in recent years, it offers a unique flavor that is best suited to American Ales. With an alpha acid range of about 9.4% to 12.4%, Comet hops offer a substantial bittering quality paired with a distinctly American grassy and citrus aroma. Bittering your American style brew with Comet hops can be objectionable to some, but when done properly the result is one of a kind. Galena and Summit both offer a more readily available substitute to Comet when necessary. See if brewing with this hop is right for you by tasting the effects in highly-rated brews like Brew Dog’s IPA and Dead Comet IPA.

CRYSTAL

A very clean aroma hop that produces a mild, floral and spicy aroma. Due to it being mild and clean, this hop variety can be used in a variety of beer styles, including: Lagers, Kolsch, ESB, Pilsners, Pale Ales, IPAs, and Belgian Ales

FUGGLE

With an interesting lineage stemming from Cascade, Brewer’s Gold, and Early Green hops, Crystal hops are most commonly used for their aromatic properties. Released from the USDA’s breeding program in 1993, this versatile hop compliments a wide variety of beer styles. The low alpha acid range of about 3.5% to 5.5% lets a wonderfully woodsy, earthy aroma shine with notes of spicy cinnamon and black pepper. Crystal hops are so flexible they make a great addition to styles like IPAs and ESBs as well as they are a great choice for many lager styles. Though Crystal hops are generally available in both whole and pellet form, you could also use Hallertau, Mt. Hood or Liberty Hops in their place. Taste this hop in commercial brews like Rogue Brewing Co.’s Brutal Bitters or Nut Brown Ale from Wild River Brewing Company.

GLACIER

This versatile hop is an excellent substitute for Fuggle, Willamette, Tettnang.

HALLERTAU

Hallertau, or Hallertauer hops can be found in multiple variations around the globe. This popular aroma hop is grown and utilized in New Zealand, the U.S. and its native Germany. Though the region affects the outcome of the overall characteristics of the hop, Hallertau hops all share a basic profile. With a lower alpha acid range that generally stays between 3% and 5%, Hallertau hops are normally used for their aromatic influence in a brew. Expect an herbaceous floral scent with a hint of spice and a hay-like quality. These aromatics pair perfectly with Belgian style Ales, Lagers, and Bocks. Test out domestic, German and New Zealand Hallertau hops in the same brew to sense the subtle differences. If you need a substitute, any hop from the Hallertau family, like Hallertau Mittelfruh works fine.

GOLDING

One of the most traditional English varietals, Golding hops hail from a lineage of East Kent Goldings. Having been produced in the U.K. for over 200 years, Goldings have also become popular amongst American brewers for several decades. A unique aroma of mild sweetness and light floral let this hop lend a pleasing flavor to lighter styles of beer. With an alpha acid range of about 4% to 7%, Goldings tend to be used only for their aromatic characteristics. Try this classic varietal in styles like ESB, Brown Ales, and Porters. If you’re looking for another option with similar properties, try out East Kent Golding or Willamette. Give Golding a taste in brews like Desert Storm Pale Ale from Storm Brewing Co.

Golding hops
Golding hops

HORIZON

American bred Horizon hops are a sister to Nugget hops with lineage including Brewer’s Gold and Early Green. Released in Oregon in 1997, Horizon contains the lowest cohumulone levels of any hop. Utilized for both bittering and aromatic characteristics, this hop makes the best impression on American style Ales, but fares well in Lagers, too. An alpha acid range of about 11% to 13% allows this hop to be utilized at any stage of the brewing process. The lush scent of spice and floral with a hint of citrus makes this hop work well in a wide variety of beer styles. If you can’t find Horizon hops, try substituting with Magnum hops. To taste Horizon hops in commercial brews, try the Horizon Red IPA from Summit Brewing Co.

KENT GOLDING

American bred Horizon hops are a sister to Nugget hops with lineage including Brewer’s Gold and Early Green. Released in Oregon in 1997, Horizon contains the lowest cohumulone levels of any hop. Utilized for both bittering and aromatic characteristics, this hop makes the best impression on American style Ales, but fares well in Lagers, too. An alpha acid range of about 11% to 13% allows this hop to be utilized at any stage of the brewing process. The lush scent of spice and floral with a hint of citrus makes this hop work well in a wide variety of beer styles. If you can’t find Horizon hops, try substituting with Magnum hops. To taste Horizon hops in commercial brews, try the Horizon Red IPA from Summit Brewing Co.

MAGNUM

A cross between Galena and a German male hop, Magnum hops are available in both German and U.S. grown varieties. The German varietal is known as Hallertau Magnum, so it’s generally clear where your hops came from. Primarily used as a bittering hop, Magnum has only a mild, herbal, piney and resinous aroma typical of high alpha varietals. The alpha acid range of 10% to 14% provides perfect bittering in beer styles like IPAs, Pale Ales, and even Stouts. This clean bittering agent is what makes Magnum hops so popular. If you can’t find Magnum in whole or pellet form, try substituting with Nugget or Hallertauer Taurus. Try Magnum in Paulaner’s Extra Dry Premium Pilsner.

MOUNT RANIER

Mt. Rainier hops come from a complex parentage including Hallertauer and Magnum, and are bred at Oregon State University. With an alpha acid content of 5% to 8%, Mt. Rainier is commonly used as a dual purpose hop. A moderate bittering agent as well as an aroma of light floral mixed with citrus and licorice overtones, these hops make a nice addition to many beer styles. Substituting Mt. Rainier hops can be done with Fuggle or Hallertauer hops.

NEWPORT

Newport hops were developed by the USDA as a descendent of Hallertau Magnum hops and released in 2002. This high alpha hop is most commonly used as a bittering agent in brews. Containing a mild flavor and aroma of citrus with a hint of balsamic, Newport is typically used in American ales. With a relatively high alpha acid range between 13.5% and 17%, Newport provides excellent bittering in numerous beer styles. If you want to substitute Newport hops in your brew, try using parents Magnum or Nugget hops.

NUGGET

Newport hops were developed by the USDA as a descendent of Hallertau Magnum hops and released in 2002. This high alpha hop is most commonly used as a bittering agent in brews. Containing a mild flavor and aroma of citrus with a hint of balsamic, Newport is typically used in American ales. With a relatively high alpha acid range between 13.5% and 17%, Newport provides excellent bittering in numerous beer styles. If you want to substitute Newport hops in your brew, try using parents Magnum or Nugget hops.

Newport hops
Newport hops

OLD HILL

Our own proprietary hop, found in the bush in Turkey Point, coming down Old Hil Road.

SAAZ

A slightly toasty, sweet, breadiness, akin to a biscuit.One of the Noble hops that orginated near the town of Saaz in the Czech Republic and is now grown around the world. Whether American, Australian, or European in origin, the Saaz hop is one of the most popular and replicated varietals in the world. Saaz was originally used as an aromatic hop famous for European lagers. It has been found that in popular styles like Belgian Ales, Light Lagers and Pilsners, Saaz can be used for its soft bittering quality as well. Has an alpha acid range of about 3% to 5%. Prized for its classic herbal, earthy, and spicy aroma. Try Czech Saaz in commercial brews like Lost Coast Brewery’s Winterbraun Brown Ale.

SORACHI ACE

This Japanese hop was created from a mix of Brewer’s Gold, a Saazer parent, and Beiki male by Sapporo Brewers. Released in 1984, this hop is a cornerstone of the world famous Sapporo Lager. With an alpha acid range of about 10% to 16%, this high alpha is predominantly used for its sharp bittering agent. Sorachi Ace also adds a uniquely fresh aroma of lemon, citrus, dill and cilantro to everything from IPAs and Pale Ales to Lagers. Sorachi Ace pellet or whole hops compliment Citra and Simcoe, and could be substituted with those varietals. If you’re looking for a taste of Sorachi Ace, just head to your nearest sushi bar and grab a bottle of Sapporo!

SUPER ALPHA NZ

This high alpha acid hop variety from New Zealand can be used for bittering or aroma additions. With a typical alpha of 10-12%, Dr. Rudi (formerly Super Alpha) Hops have a soft aroma that is mainly floral with a bit of citrus, giving impressions of lemongrass and aromatic cedar.

TAHOMA

Recently released by Washington State University in 2013, Tahoma hops are daughter to Glacier hops. Primarily utilized for its aromatic properties of cedar, pine, pepper, and citrus, this hop is quickly gaining popularity. Containing an alpha acid range of 7.2% to 8.2%, bittering is minimal and lets the Pacific Northwest inspired aroma shine through. Try Tahoma in your next recipe for an IPA or American Pale Ale. The easiest way to provide a substitute for Tahoma hops would be with parent Glacier.

TETTNANG

Sometimes referred to as Tettnang, Schwetzinger, or Deutscher Frühopfen, Tettnanger hops are a natural land race originating in the Tettnang region of Germany. A traditional noble hop, Tettnanger has been crossed with Fuggles and re-grown in a variety of regions around the world including the U.S., Australia, and Switzerland. While these Tettnanger hops go by the same name and offer the same applications in brewing, you will get a slightly different aroma and higher bittering potential due to the cross with Fuggles. With German Tettnanger hops, expect that spicy aroma with hints of floral, earthy goodness. Tettnanger has a slightly lower alpha acid range of about 3% to 6% and makes for a perfect addition to German Ales, Lagers, and Wheat Beers. Santiam hops, Spault, and Fuggles are good substitutes for Tettnanger hops if needed.

tettnang hops
tettnang hops

TRIPLE PEARL

A slightly toasty, sweet, breadiness, akin to a biscuit.One of the newest hops out of Washington’s Yakima Valley, Triple Pearl hops are the product of an open pollination between Pearle and an unknown male with lineage from Northern Brewer and Hallertau. This combination presents the opportunity for a dual purpose brewing ingredient, though it has predominantly been used for aromatic characteristics in early testing. With an alpha acid range of 10.3% to 11.2%, Triple Pearl will offer a smooth, mild bittering agent to brews like IPAs and Pales. What really comes through is a balanced aroma of melon, citrus, resin, and peppery spice that also pairs well with Wheats. Since Triple Pearl is so new to the market and can be hard to find, Pearle is the closest substitution.

ULTRA

This American hop is a seedling of Hallertau Mittelfruh and half sister to Mt. Hood, Liberty, and Crystal hops, exhibiting similar characteristics to these varietals. Released in 1995, Ultra hops are primarily grown in the U.S. due to their low yield. Most widely used as an aromatic addition to brews, Ultra gets its mild aroma of spice and floral from its German lineage. With an alpha acid range from about 2% to 5%, Ultra is not normally used as a bittering addition. Tettnanger and Hallertau Tradition make suitable replacements for Ultra when needed.

VANGUARD

Vanguard hops are a USDA cross with Hallertauer lineage released for cultivation in 1997. Vanguard is an ideal addition in any Belgian Ale. Expect an aroma similar to Hallertauer Mittelfruh with notes of spice, florals and a touch of woodsy flavor. If you’re looking for a substitute for Vanguard pellet or whole hops in your next Lager, Wheat, or Belgian Ale, Hallertauer Mittelfruh works well, but you could also try Liberty or Mt. Hood. See if you can find Dogfish Head Brewery’s Steampunk Porter on tap to get a taste of Vanguard hops

WILLIAMETTE

A triploid seedling of the English Fuggle variety, Willamette is the most widely grown hop in the U.S., originally released from the USDA Breeding Program in 1976. Somewhere between English and American, the aroma of Willamette hops is its main application in brewing. Slightly spicy with floral and fruity notes, Willamette can be utilized in just about any beer style, but is commonly used in English Ales, Golden Ales, and Brown Ales. Willamette pairs rather well with numerous other hop varietals, often times bringing out and complementing their aromas. Both Fuggles and Tettnanger are good replacements if you can’t seem to find Willamette pellet or whole hops. Try Buffalo Gold Pale Ale or St. James Irish Red Ale from Colorado’s Walnut Brewery for a taste of Willamette hops.

YAKIMA GOLD

A descendent of Early Cluster and a Slovenian male, Yakima Gold was just released by Washington State University in 2013. With a pleasant, Saaz like aroma of spice and floral and an alpha acid content of 8.8% to 10.5%, Yakima Gold is utilized as a dual purpose hop. This traditional aroma and smooth bitterness compliment beer styles like dark Ales, IPAs, and even some Lagers. If in need of a substitution for Yakima Gold hops, try Early Cluster or Saaz hops. Give Yakima a taste in craft brews like Victory Brewing Co.’s Yakima Glory Dark IPA.

ZEUS

Aptly named after the god of lightning and thunder, proprietary American hybrid variety Zeus is a high yielding hop with a pleasant aroma noted for its pungent hoppy “kick” and spicy, herbal flavor and aroma. Though it is sometimes considered identical to Columbus and Tomahawk®, or CTZ as they are sometimes sold, it has been identified as being genetically distinct from these two varieties. It does share remarkable similarities to both however. Though the exact parentage of Zeus has not been identified it is suspected to have been derived from Brewers Gold.

zeus-hops
zeus hops

 


Related Equipment
Related News
Hops Pellet Mill For Sale Canada, How Much Is A Hop Pelletizer
The hop pellet machine is to pellet hop powder, and the pell ...09-07
How Are Hops Pelletized, How To Pelletize Hops?
How Are Hops Pelletized, How To Pelletize Hops?So, here you ...09-04
Hop Pelletizing Equipment, Pellet Machine For Hops
Hops are used primarily as a bittering, flavouring, and stab ...08-26

From Order To Delivery

Checking Order

With the sales contract, the order tracking clerk checks the models and quantities of each machine and spare parts.

Quality Test Before Delivery

Upon completion of the manufacturing of equipment, tthe quality inspector strictly checks quality of every machine with the checklist.

Check Items When Packing

Before packaging and shipment, the order tracking clerk checks the packaged items again with the packing list to avoid loss of items.

Sign the contract

Adopting international common standards for accurate design of product packaging, prevent product damage rate and the effective use of transport tools, which ensure the perfect delivery of products.

Get the minimum offer free of charge, please fill in the following information to tell us (confidential information, not open to the public)

Product:
Name:
E-mail:
Tel:
Message:

+86 15003890639

Copyright © 2015-2020 by HENAN RICHI MACHINERY CO,LTD.All rights reserved. Tel:0086-15003890639 Email:sales@cnrichi.cn